Microsoft Azure Event Grid–part 3

Azure Event Hubs This is part 3 in my blog series on Azure Event Grid.  Part 1 and Part 2. One of the great new stories in Microsoft Azure’s Event lineup of products and features is Azure Event Hubs, which is Microsoft’s highly scalable data streaming platform and event ingestion service built on top of the AMQP 1.0 protocol.  Event Hubs allows for the processing of millions of events per second at a highly affordable cost.  Current offerings price out to 2.8 cents per million events. What exactly are Event Hubs and how do they work?  A good place to start is a diagram from the Azure Event Hubs overview Fig. 1 Azure Event Hubs – Event ingestor architecture Event Producers In a microservices architecture, Event Hubs can play an important role as the “front door” for data.  Data can originate from many Event Producers such as a website, a mobile application, IoT applications, or smaller devices that consume low power and can be connected off and on. Collection This data can be collected by cloud gateways such as API’s – restful interfaces exposed in the cloud to applications reaching out with appropriate credentials.  It can also be collected by…

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Microsoft Azure Event Grid–part 2

This blog is a continuation of the series started in Part 1 on Microsoft Azure Event Grid, which focused on the overall event framework offering in Azure.  In this article I want to get in to detail on the concept of a Serverless event-based framework and how it ties into Azure offerings. Serverless Serverless computing in general is a cloud computing model where the cloud provider dynamically manages the allocation of infrastructure to support the application.  The pricing is based upon sub-second utilization in Azure, and is based upon the actual amount of resources consumed by the application as opposed to pre-allocating purchased infrastructure units and allowing them to sit dormant.   In an Azure Functions video I watched it was shared that 75% of customers see a price advantage from dynamic resource allocation, or “serverless” computing. One of the key tenets of serverless computing is that everything is driven by events and it completely fits hand in hand with the event-driven programming and architecture concepts introduced in my first blog post.   In many ways this represents the next logical step in cloud computing – along the chain from IaaS, to PaaS, to Serverless. Microsoft’s main serverless component offerings are Azure…

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Microsoft Azure Event Grid

One of the current features that Microsoft has in preview in Azure is Event Grid.  Events in Azure represent a new ability to design applications at massive scale that are based upon an event-driven model.    There are several advantages to architecting applications in an event-driven pattern.    In this blog series, I will drill into Microsoft’s Azure Event product offerings, examine some of the underlying concepts in architecture and programming behind them, talk about the advantages they provide, and show concrete examples of implementation. To start first, let’s investigate why Azure Event Grid might be of interest to us, and what potential benefits it might bring to include into our architecture design. Why? Underlying Concepts Two key concepts surface when talking about Microsoft’s Azure product offerings in the event area are event-driven programming and closely related, event-driven architecture. Event-driven programming In computer programming, event-driven programming is a programming paradigm in which the flow of the program is determined by events such as user actions (mouse clicks, key presses), sensor outputs, or messages from other programs/threads. (from Wikipedia). Event-driven architecture Event-driven architecture (EDA), also known as Message-driven architecture, is a software architecture pattern promoting the production, detection, consumption of, and reaction to…

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Microservices, .NET Core, the Cloud, and You

Seriously, what is up with software development trends lately?  I know every discipline has their own jargon, but to hear some of the stuff flying around lately when I step out of it has me wondering whether I’m writing software or am late to a wedding in Tahiti.   To communicate my relationship with the .NET world I have to go back a few years.  Like many, I have spent a great deal of time on the Microsoft stack, and have been coding for the web from the beginning transferring over from classic ASP pages to Web Forms v1.   “The stack” as I probably will refer to it throughout my blogging is whatever current stack of technologies and toolsets the .NET world has on its radar.   I do have some front end JavaScript skills, and a love for front-end frameworks, but I’m not really coming from the Google/Node background perspective – most all of my paid coding has been on the Microsoft technology stack, so working with that and advancing that are things that are in my primary area of interest. So with the limits of that filter, what is up with software development trends lately?  To me, software trends remarkably…

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Blog Reboot

For those of you visiting this site for the first time in a long while, I have decided to take my blogging efforts in a new direction.   Previously, my blog had the title – “3 Degrees of SharePoint” and centered around the SharePoint product, community, and services. While I still love SharePoint, both its online component in Office 365 and the power of the product as an on-premise product, it has not been the sole focus of my career spanning its duration, and as such i wanted to expand my topic coverage and re-focus to my primary area and fundamental area, that of software development. I appreciate your taking the time to visit my site and blog.  It is a privilege to me for those in the world to value my thoughts enough to take the time to read.   I hope I can enrich your life a little as a reader and consumer of my blog. Dave Milner  

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